Football’s cross cultural appeal

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RESC FC v Trinity Catholic College FC.

Trinity Catholic College Regents Park hosted a group of 16 Japanese junior soccer players on Tuesday for a friendly match and experience of school life in Australia.

The Japanese students’ visit was part of an exchange program run between Birrong Sports Football Club and Suita City FC, Osaka Japan. The players were billeted with families from the Trinity school community who also play for the Birrong club.

It is the fourth time Year 10 students and referee during the friendly match, Joshua Davis, and his family have hosted students from the Japanese club. He has learnt some of their language along the way.  “Meeting the new people, learning their culture and language is the best part, and seeing how they play as well,” he said. “It was a really good game.”

The College’s assistant sports coordinator Adam Baeta, who also plays for the Birrong Club, organised the school visit. “Every two years the club organises an exchange and once every six years we send kids over there,” he said.

Meeting the new people, learning their culture and language is the best part.

– Joshua Davis

“When the Japanese students arrived we asked them some questions about their culture, how school life is for them and about their football. Our Year 7 team won the grand final for the MCS [Metropolitan Catholic Schools] division this year, and our Year 7 team from last year also won the 2014 grand final, so we also showed them highlights from our matches. They were pretty excited to see that. “

The students also joined in morning classes including a volleyball game in PDHPE, textiles, woodwork, and a Science class where they observed experiments with dry ice.  Trinity’s football team then played the Suita City team, winning the match 3-0.DSCN0450a

Mr Baeta said organisers made the visit hands-on to help bridge the language barrier, and the teams coach also helped to translate.

Year 7 student Olivia Galic and two other student leaders facilitated the question and answer session with the visitors.  She said they were very inquisitive.

“They interested in how we do things here and enjoyed the visit, seeing a different perspective, talking about how they do things and interacting with us,” she said.

“As much as we wanted to know what they do, they were really interested in us as well.”

 

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